Full-length Feature: Tracing the Mediterranean (Part 2) – The Best Coffee is in Naples

For many of you, I’m sure, Italy is no stranger. The country, which boasts 54 World Heritage Sites, including countless priceless relics / ruins from the glorious Roman Empire (which at its peak, stretched from as far as the Middle East and North Africa to the south of England), is abundantly rich in ancient history, tradition, food and culture.

For me, after 40 years of my existence, this would only be my first trip to the famous Shoe/Boot of the Mediterranean. And one that took me more than a month to put the itinerary together…

Now, back to Naples.

Mention Naples, and the first thing that comes to mind for most would be Pompeii, the Roman city that was completely destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79.DSC09519_blogToday, the ruins of Pompeii are a must for any visit to the capital of Italy’s Campania region. As your train from Rome approaches Naples, the imposing sight of Mt Vesuvius greets your arrival.

It’s difficult to imagine Mt Vesuvius as the same beast that engulfed Pompeii in lava more than a thousand years ago. Rather, Vesuvius feels like the guardian mountain of Naples.DSC09362_blogThe Italian people of Naples, or Neapolitans (as they are more fondly known) take pride in their coffee and pizza. You wouldn’t find Starbucks or Pizza Hut here – they would simply fail to survive alongside the thousands of Neapolitan cafes and pizzerias that churn out one of the best (if not the best) coffee and pizza in the world.DSC09349_blogTo get the most of your Neapolitan experience, simply hop into one of the many cafes in Centro Storico, and order an espresso (0.90 to 1.00 euros) and a cornetto (croissant) and have them at the bar counter (there are seat charges for indoor and outdoor dining). So many locals prefer to stand at the bar anyway.

For pizza, I would suggest you have a look around the Spanish Quarter for the cheapest yet amazingly delicious pizza or pasta.

 
The Spanish Quarter is one of my favourite spots to just get lost and wander around. There are markets, trinket shops, roadside vendors selling anything from slippers to antique watches. It’s also where I tasted some of the freshest and most delicious seafood and pasta in Naples.DSC09819_blogDSC09420_blogNaples is a compact city, and many of Naples’ main sights are arranged around Centro Storico, and easily reached on foot. For those slightly further away, Naples’ small (only two lines) but efficient metro lines link most of the sights.
 

As for me, I prefer to wander around on foot, taking in as many of the sights as I can, and just soaking in the local vibes. DSC09407_blogDSC09667_blogDSC09664_blogNaples has some of the most beautiful sunsets in the world, and I would recommend you set aside one evening to have a leisurely stroll along the port area, which stretches from just before Castel dell’Ovo to the marina at Mergellina.

If you are planning day trips from Naples, as mentioned above, Pompeii is a must!!! And depending on the duration of your stay in Naples, you can choose to visit Herculaneum (somewhat like Pompeii, but smaller), scale Mt Vesuvius, or perhaps the most popular choice – a visit to the Amalfi Coast or the island of Capri.DSC09495_blogNote though that the latter two places are actually in opposite directions, so it’s not advisable to combine the two for one day-trip. For example, I didn’t have time for Capri because I spent an entire day at Pompeii (I had initially planned for only half a day at the Pompeii ruins).

To get to the Amalfi Coast, take the train to Sorrento (about 1.5 hours) and then transfer to a local bus (another 2 hours) for Positano or Amalfi. More ambitious travelers would combine Ravello to complete the Amalfi trinity. However, do note that the last bus to Sorrento train station departs at 7 p.m., so unless you are planning to stay the night, it’s wise to give yourself ample time or start your trip early.DSC09735_blogDSC09773_blogFor me, I didn’t even get as far as Ravello, and even Amalfi was a bit of a stretch for me. Besides, the shorter daylight hours during winter (I went in February) meant that I had less time to explore as everything gets dark after 5 p.m.

Ideally, I would have liked more time at Amalfi because Positano, the first town along the Amalfi bus route, was beautiful but sterile in my opinion. Its postcard perfect beach, with the colourful hillside houses, was touristy and expensive.

That said, catching the sunset at the Amalfi coast was probably one of the highlights of my day trip to the Amalfi strip. And the best way to enjoy it is with a cup of Neapolitan espresso.     LSDSC09675_blog

Full-length Feature: Tracing the Mediterranean (Part 1)

I promised to leave Japan when I wrote my last post for 2018. As some of you might know, I failed to do so. This time, it’s for real.

This is a trip that has been four years in the making. I first had the idea of tracing the cities along the Mediterranean coastline in 2016, because I’ve always been fascinated with the Mediterranean region.

Countries like Italy, the south of France, Spain and Portugal are so rich in history, cuisine and culture. I had always been interested in ancient civilizations, in particular the Greek and Roman Empires.

Of course, to visit every major city in the Mediterranean region in one trip is almost impossible. I originally planned to spend four and a half months covering the coastline from Central Italy to Portugal, but due to my sheer ignorance of the Schengen ruling, I was forced to cut Portugal (and a side trip to Morocco) altogether and scale down the plan to meet the 90-day allowance for non-European Union citizens.

Still, three months of traveling nonetheless looks a bit daunting, given the longest I’ve continuously been on the road (not including my two-year stay in Japan) was a 24-day solo trip to Central and Eastern Europe (Germany, Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, and Austria) back in June, 2012.


Central & Eastern Europe Trip – June 2012

This time, I would spend almost three weeks to slightly over a month in each of the Mediterranean countries I planned to visit, starting with Italy, then to the south of France, and finally ending in Spain.

My first stop?

Naples, Italy.     LS

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