Spirited Away (Part 2)

Kiyomizu-dera, Kyoto

DSC03862From those previous two experiences at the Fuji Sengen Shrine and the Fushimi-inari Shrine, I realised that perhaps, I am more sensitive to the ‘spiritual’ aura of a place. At the risk of sounding bonkers or hallucinatory, especially to those skeptical of the existence of ghosts or the paranormal, I shall let you, the reader decide if you believe or not.

Of course, not all temples and shrines in Japan are spooky. Take Kyoto, for example. Feudal Japan’s ancient capital probably has the largest concentration of temples and shrines in a single city. However, on one of my visits to a temple, a Buddhist monk actually told me a very interesting fact about the temples in Kyoto.  According to him, many of these temples have a secondary function. They serve as auxiliary military outposts, where armies can be gathered / hidden, and also from which armies can be deployed to launch a surprise attack on the enemy.

DSC03845Many temple grounds in Kyoto are uncannily palatial and are often built with ‘secret’ chambers or passageways. I’m not sure about your reaction but a light bulb instantly switched on in my head when I heard this. Of course it all makes sense to me now!! Temples are not only meant for monks or shinto priests. They may even have served as the secret hideouts of fugitive lords.

Many temples and shrines in Kyoto are designed like forts, if you think about it. Consider Kiyomizu-dera (清水寺, literally “Pure Water Temple”), a UNESCO World Heritage Site. A long passageway lined with stalls (i.e. the Higashiyama District) is now a bustling tourist attraction. However, during the days of yore, it may have served as both a merchant town and important ‘refueling’ stop for the feudal lord’s army. Kiyomizu-dera’s outstanding feature, a massive wooden stage that offers spectacular views of the old capital, could have served the dual role of a lookout in its halcyon days.

DSC03857Looking out from the stage, you can feel the calmness and serenity of the vast temple grounds. The same tranquillity can be keenly felt in the other shrines and features, for example, the Jishu Shrine famous for its matchmaking prowess, the Otowa Waterfall, whose waters are said to bestow longevity and prosperity, or the vermilion Zuigudo Hall. The positive energy that exudes from Kiyomizu-dera (清水寺) makes this a powerful ‘spiritual spot’ in Kyoto.   LS

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(to be continued in Part 3)

Any images published in this article, unless otherwise stated, are owned by the author. Any unauthorised reproduction or use of these images in any form is strictly prohibited. Please kindly write to me for permission to use any of the images. Thank you very much. 😊

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Spirited Away (Part 1)

DSC03904I’ve been toying with the idea of this post for a while, but haven’t really got down to penning it until today. Spring vacation has just started, and it’s a much needed welcome change to see more of the sun. It’s also a time for many going away for short trips to recharge their batteries.

I’m not sure how this idea fits in with spring or cherry blossoms but nevertheless, if you’re planning to visit these spots, just read this with a light heart. What’s all this mystery ’bout, these spots, you might ask. I’m of course referring to power spots in Japan. Now you may have come cross this term from your research on the Internet, Tripadvisor or Lonely Planet. So I’m going to put forth a few disclaimers before we dive right into them.

Disclaimers:-

1. The term “power spot” started gaining traction in Japan since the 1990s, and as defined by All About Japan.com, these are sites that exude a particular energy based on concepts of feng shui. You don’t have to possess a ‘sixth sense’ to feel this spiritual energy. The site goes on to list the top 20 power spots in Japan. Now, this post is not about those ‘power spots’, although some of the listed sites may also be classed as such. Therefore, I would like to propose the term “spiritual spots” when referring to the spots I’m going to introduce in this post.

2. Those who are familiar with the concept of ‘power spots’, or who have read articles on them may find that the sites I’ve listed are not the same as the ones they have read or come across. Again, let me reiterate that I would prefer to call these sites “spiritual spots” instead of “power spots”. These sites do exude a particular energy. However, this energy may not be the positive energy associated with ‘power spots’. In other words, or in more layman terms, some of these sites are possibly ‘haunted’.

3. The experiences at these ‘spiritual spots’ are personal and are based on my own experiences on my travels. However, based on other articles I’ve read or researched, I can say with a certain degree of authority that these experiences are legitimate. You, the reader, have the choice to believe it or not.

4. It’s no surprise that many of the spots listed in this post are temples or shrines. After all, many of these revered places of worship have a history dating back hundreds or even a thousand years. In addition, many temples and shrines also serve as the final resting places of the deceased. Temples and shrines are used to refer distinctly to Buddhist (temples) and Shinto (shrines) respectively.

With these disclaimers in place, let’s jump right into these sites.

(Kitaguchi Honguu) Fuji Sengen Shrine, Yamanashi Prefecture

IMG_4306I first visited Japan in December 2011. That was also the year of the Great East Japan Earthquake that decimated a huge area of the Tohoku region and placed Japan on every traveler’s warning list for countries to avoid, not so much due to the possibility of another major earthquake or tsunami but rather the nuclear fallout from the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant in Sendai. However, I went against convention because air tickets to Japan plummeted that year. I couldn’t pass up the opportunity of finally visiting the country of my dreams.

Like any first-time visitor to Japan, I headed to Tokyo and took a day trip out to see Mount Fuji. Knowing that it’s early winter, and that hiking trails to Mt. Fuji were closed, the sole purpose of my visit was just to see Mt. Fuji from afar and to explore the Five Lakes area round Mt. Fuji, that is, Kawaguchiko (河口湖).

IMG_4269Not sure how this shrine appeared on my itinerary, but I remembered reading about it somewhere that the entrance to one of the hiking trails to Mt. Fuji actually starts from the shrine’s backyard. Sounds like an interesting place to explore, doesn’t it? A Japanese colleague to whom I recently spoke to about this shrine as a ‘spiritual spot’ did a search on the Internet, and burst out in laughter. Apparently, according to what he found online, this place is also famous as a “love shrine” – one of those shrines that are popular with women seeking a romantic or marriage partner. Hmmm…from these pictures I took, I could never have known. Could you?

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Fushimi-inari Shrine, Kyoto

DSC03890I know what you’re thinking when you see this name. Of course, this has to be a ‘power spot’. This is probably one of the top three most popular shrines in Kyoto, and possibly also the most photographed besides the Golden Pavilion Temple. However, I would like to offer my own take on this shrine to you. This shrine is really really creepy!!

Most tourists to Fushimi-inari Shrine (伏見稲荷大社) are fascinated by the thousands of crimson and vermilion torii gates that wound around the hill on which the shrine is situated. Do you also know that many tourists do not make it past the half-way mark up the hill? Because, frankly speaking, the shrine grounds are huge, and the trek up the hill takes some effort. Most tourists make it as far as a pond which leads to a cave-like path that is dotted with fox (or kitsune) figurines. I say “cave-like” because the fox shrine is dark even during daytime. There’s even an urban myth that you should not go beyond this point.

For those who have, however, you will soon reach a cemetery built on the hillside, so there are steps leading to the tombstones, many of which are guarded by these fox figurines. Foxes or kitsune, have a long storied history in Japanese folklore. They are believed to possess supernatural abilities and are said to be able to shape-shift, taking on human forms. Some stories tell of fox spirits with nine tails, and possessing wisdom and magical powers. You can easily do a search online for spooky tales regarding these parts of the Fushimi-inari Shrine.

My own experience tells me that perhaps on hindsight, I should not have taken pictures here. I definitely felt the creeps here, and ‘power spot’ or not, I would advise you to be very respectful if you’re exploring these parts of the shrine.    LS

DSC03942Any images published in this article, unless otherwise stated, are owned by the author. Any unauthorised reproduction or use of these images in any form is strictly prohibited. Please kindly write to me for permission to use any of the images. Thank you very much. 😊

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(to be continued in Part 2)