Full-length Feature: Tracing the Mediterranean (Part 3) – A Heart Full of Rome (Part 1 of 2)

Rome is drop-dead beautiful!!

I’m lost for descriptions every time I look at the Rome skyline at sunset. A plethora of emotions goes through your heart as you gaze and admire. Everywhere you look, all 360 degrees, there’s something that draws out from you a sigh of contentment, of admiration, of awe and wonder.

I’m not going to describe or go into detail about the sights I have seen in my one week stay in Rome. For these, you have a host of travel guides or blogs that will do these sights more justice than me.

Instead, I shall focus on my experiences and thoughts on what I’ve seen and felt in Rome.

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View from Victor Emmanuel II

I have to admit, I didn’t know where to start my exploration of Rome when I first arrived. I mean, I already had some kind of an itinerary in mind, but there seems to me, so much to see and do in the Eternal City.

For the first two days, I decided to follow closely a walking guide called Romewise.com by Elyssa Bernard, that was suggested to me by a young Polish girl, who bunked in the same room as me during my stay in Naples. She recommended the website because she and her sister had relied on it for their three-day tour of Rome and found it to be quite beneficial.

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Piazza Barberini
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Spanish Steps / Scalinata di Trinità dei Monti
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Piazza del Popolo
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Pincio
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View from the Pincio
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Victor Emmanuel II Monument
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So, to cut a long story short, I didn’t follow her guide to the T because I found it too intense for one day. You would have to start your day very early or you must have very muscular thighs to cover all that she suggested. Instead, I split her suggested ‘1st day walking tour’ into 2 days, and tweaked the route to form like two circular routes, as summarised below:

Day 1: Piazza Barberini >> Spanish Steps >> Piazza del Popolo >> Pincio >> Piazza Venezia >> Vittorio Emanuele II Monument (or Altare della Patria)

Day 2: Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri (Basilica of St. Mary of the Angels and the Martyrs) >> Piazza della Repubblica >> Basilica Papale di Santa Maria Maggiore (Church of Santa Maria Maggiore >> Scuderie del Quirinale >> Trevi Fountain >> Pantheon >> Piazza Navona >> Campo dei Fiori >> Largo Argentina.

I’m so glad I rounded up my first day at the Vittorio Emmanuel II, Rome’s famed “birthday cake”, because from the marble terrace (which offers a more or less  360 degree panorama over the city centre) overlooking Piazza Venezia, I caught my first view of the Colosseum and the Roman Forum at sunset. You can even see as far as St Peter’s Basilica.

The domes / cupolas and cathedral steeples dotting the Rome skyline, bathed in golden light. It was such a mesmerising sight!!

Rome is compact in that sense, because all the ancient Roman ruins are more or less clustered together in one place – although the walking is anything but.

I hung around at the terrace till the last light went out, and after a thousand snaps of the Roma city skyline.

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Colosseum at night

Reluctantly, I left my vantage point and made a beeline for the Colosseum. Just seeing the Colosseum right there before your eyes makes my heart skip a beat – okay, several beats a few times.

As I approached the almost 2,000-year-old Roman relic, I caught sight of a cluster of modestly decked low-rise apartment blocks just across from the Colosseum. And I could not help but wonder what it’s like to stay just across from the Colosseum.

This must be one of the world’s most expensive real estates, I thought.

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Trajan’s Market / Mercati di Traiano

How does it feel to know that the ‘building’ just across from you was there long before you were born, and will still be there long after you die? Random, weird thoughts I know, but it’s a legit question.

I decided I would dedicate one full day to the Colosseum – a single entry ticket also gives you admission to the Roman Forum / Roman ruins and the Palatine Hill / Palatino, and is valid for two days. So, a tip here is not to rush the visit to the Colosseum, and then attempt to wrap up your ticket to the Roman Forum and Palatine Hill – there’s no way you are going to appreciate either.

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For now, I’m just contented to sit at one of the stone benches near the aforementioned apartments and gazed at the Colosseum, now dappled in a soft glow in the moonlight.   LS

Note: This post features only photographs taken from the first day of my walking tour in Rome. More photographs of Rome will be featured in Part 2.